Snow day

Discussion in 'Free Range' started by BLT, Jan 21, 2014.

  1. BLT

    BLT Chicken

    Anyone else dealing with snow today? I'm trying out my handy dandy windshield cover that supposedly keeps the ice off your windshield but I think the damned thing is freezing to the glass. FML
     
  2. deet

    deet Chicken

    Snowed last night for us and has been fine since, thank god. Let me know when it's June. Thanks.
     
  3. Vespidae

    Vespidae Antagonist Staff Member

    I have no idea. I'm getting sick and I have the day off so I don't intend to even look out a window today. I'm in bed watching TV. My rooster said it was ridiculously cold out though.
     
  4. deet

    deet Chicken

    Aww, feel better V! It's cold here too, but I doubt it's Canada cold.
     
  5. Vespidae

    Vespidae Antagonist Staff Member

    Thank you. I asked him to bring me Chicklets and a Bounty bar but he refuses to go outside. Dammit.
     
  6. gimmeoatmeal

    gimmeoatmeal Chicken

    Feel better, V. Sending virtual Vick's vapor rub.

    It's 70 degrees outside. I believe in global warming.
     
  7. BLT

    BLT Chicken

    Feel better soon!
     
  8. Fitz

    Fitz Leslie Knope Monster

    Not yet. I'm sick too, V! Snow should start any minute and it's pretty cold out.
     
  9. sweatermuffins

    sweatermuffins Chicken

    I am home - I went into work for 5 hrs and then said "F it, I'm out." Now I am painting my nails and being lazy.
     
  10. CoolWife

    CoolWife Chicken

    I'm not looking forward to returning home to piles of snow. Texas is nice in the winter.
     
  11. android

    android Founding Messiah Staff Member

    Me too, and preparing myself for the drought that is imminent.
     
  12. HBC

    HBC Chicken

    Wallowing in blankets. It was no-jacket warm and wonderful yesterday. I drinking all the wine today.
     
  13. virgo

    virgo Chicken

    Same. Have you seen the reservoirs? They're almost dried up! Scary!
     
  14. Lh718

    Lh718 Chicken

    I saw the color coded maps, and it's scary how dry the state is right now.
     
  15. Scout

    Scout Chicken

    Don't be too scared. Everyone waxed lyrical for a decade in Australia about how the awful drought was a sign that global warming was here to stay and that we had to be prepared never to see high rainfall ever again. They even started building a desalination plant.

    Then the drought broke, it rained so much that half the country was flooded, and all of our reservoirs are now full to bursting. And the desalination plant that started building in the drought, according to Wikipedia: Full production capacity was achieved by the end of 2012, however due to Melbourne's reservoirs being over 80% full the plant was immediately put into standby mode.[7]

    Fail. Drought is a natural part of the weather cycles. La Nina and El Nino give and take drought and floods - some of the most severe droughts we've had were at federation (1901). It always comes around again, it's just about increasing the amount of reservoirs that are there to catch the rain when it falls, and in the right places, and not wasting water when there's less of it.
     
  16. Lh718

    Lh718 Chicken

    I think it's a rational and even prudent reaction to fear the coming effects of one of the most severe droughts in history here. The western United States just broke a long term drought a few years ago and still hasn't recovered fully. Nevermind the ecological impacts and the day to day issues with potential water rationing coming down the road. Economically speaking, California is not in a position to be able to easily absorb the economic losses from lower crop yields, lower crop qualities, and increased livestock mortality. It's not just California that is suffering either. Texas is already feeling it from reduced winter wheat yields. The midwest, our bread basket, is also experiencing precipitation lows. The United States in general is already dealing with food prices rising from the effects of the 2012 drought. All of this at a time when the lines for food banks are still out the door.

    As for the reservoirs in the right places, hard to fill them when the rain isn't falling at all, especially during the season when they should be filling. Of course there is a cycle to all of this. Nobody says otherwise. However, there are also extrema in the cycle, and unfortunately the extreme has begun to become the norm.

    Now, tell me again that there is nothing to fear.
     
  17. gimmeoatmeal

    gimmeoatmeal Chicken

    Thank you for 'splaining things.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. virgo

    virgo Chicken

    THIS. There’s so much more to it than just water. I lived through a drought here in the 80’s and it’s not something to take lightly.
     
  19. Honey

    Honey Historian Staff Member

    Don't you mean since the 80s? I feel like I was living in a state of perpetual drought and water rations growing up in Sac.
     
  20. virgo

    virgo Chicken

    True. I feel like we’ve only had a few years that were really wet.
     
  21. Lh718

    Lh718 Chicken

    I remember a few summers in Houston where we had to ration. Some of the sheriff's deputies took to patrolling the neighborhood at night to discourage people from watering their lawns in secret. It still wasn't nearly as bad as what I know the west was going through at the time.
     
  22. Scout

    Scout Chicken

    I'm living in a country where we at one point we were looking at Stage 4 water restrictions. You couldn't wash your car. You couldn't water your garden unless it was on alternate days in the morning or evening or with tank water. You needed council approval to fill a swimming pool, and laws were brought in for water saving hoses, shower heads, toilets etc. We almost had below 25% in our reservoirs. I remember making up songs for a competition in year 4 about saving water for the drought. The drought only officially broke two years ago when I was 22.
    Then it rained so much that everyone complained...wettest spring in a decade, wettest summer in a decade etc. The thing is that the flood levels never reached the levels recorded in the 1800s, and longer droughts in regions of Australia have been recorded. It swings in roundabouts, and it's how it's always been. And obviously droughts are longer than wet weather - you only need a couple of days of constant rain to flood a town, but they can survive years with almost none.
     
  23. Lh718

    Lh718 Chicken

    So what you're saying is that a drought is nbd because it'll rain again someday. Circle of life and all that. Good for you and your ability to look beyond the short-term suffering of those around you, Panda, or how it affects the greater picture beyond yourself. No worries about the farmers that are already struggling with water shortages and effect on the overall economy. We'll just remind people dependent on the salmon industry that the rains will eventually come and make it all better again...one day. That should comfort them as the fragile salmon fisheries continue to collapse along the coast, which could trigger the shutdown of salmon fishing for a season or two and cost California billions of dollars like in 2008 and 2009.

    You can keep dazzling us with the idea that water makes things wet. Again, it's not just about not being able to wash our cars.
     
  24. android

    android Founding Messiah Staff Member

    California alone produces more than half of all the fruits and veggies for the entire USA, it's going to majorly impact our entire country if we are in a real drought emergency for any length of time.
     
  25. Fitz

    Fitz Leslie Knope Monster

    Not to mention that a) California produces the vast majority of fruits and veggies for the US and b) folding after drought becomes more severe the longer the drought happens. There are parts of the world that are turning into desert that used to be more arable land and that's a serious thing. Just because a flood happens after a long drought doesn't mean things have cycled back, especially if the region has a different historical pattern.
     

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